Jump to content

RedBull2k

DumaOS Insiders
  • Content Count

    289
  • Joined


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    RedBull2k reacted to Bert in So Many Variables!!!   
    You will never get this totally right.
    A Netduma router or any other router with QoS can only control traffic outgoing at your own network and there is stops. Netduma/DumaOS also have the option to use a geofilter to limit connections, that's where you get the major advantage over other brands.

    First of all, there is no dedicated servers in CoD in true sense of the word. A true dedicated server is an actual physical server dedicated to running the hosting software and has it's own internet connection.  What we call dedicated servers in CoD is a program running in a cloud, this cloud has multiple access nodes  which all have their own traffic load, and the cloud itself is running numerous other programs requiring internet bandwidth and prioritization levels. So performance of the hosting/server program is reliant on total usage of the cloud it's running in and total bandwidth usage of the cloud. If you have ever seen a complex like this, my place in Europe is close to a Microsoft datacenter, and the place is massive. You're easily talking over 10 football fields long and wide, having over 25 warehouse sized buildings containing their serverpark. So you can imagine it doesn't get it's internet through a single UTP cable, there is multiple fiberoptic backbones coming in. It has actually happened that I was connected to the same server complex. DumaOS showed 41ms ping. Game finishes, next game loads, I am playing on another uplink on the same servercomplex and ping read 33ms. So we can already see that their servers themselves are inconsistent.

    Before I continue, this is a good basis read:
    http://denkirson.proboards.com/thread/5972/networking-lag-compensation-hit-detection
    I think it's posted here before but it's a good foundation as to why there is issues and what is this terrible lag comp people on the internet talk about.

    Traffic coming from your router doesn't go straight to the server, but first has to cross your ISP's network. From there it goes on one or more backbones owned by a third party. From there, it usually gets connected up to a internet exchange, a place where these backbones meet and a lot of high end serverparks have a very close connection to these places, or are directly plugged in. On every segment, the owner of the network sets his own traffic shaping and prioritization ques.

    One of the largest Internet Exchanges in Europe is AMS-IX. For reference you can see how much traffic they process: https://stats.ams-ix.net/index.html What is funny here is that you can see exactly what peak time is for internet usage and peak load on the backbones and the network.

    Beginning at your ISP. Your ISP is usually oversubscribed factor 100 to factor 500. They expect their customers to use their internet in bursts so they can sell the same bandwidth multiple times if you want to call it that. Or another way of putting it. I live in a town with about 50.000 households covered by my ISP. I have 300/300 bandwidth. So if everybody had that and fired up their speedtest website, the ISP has to have 15Tb of bandwidth to my town alone, that's simply not happening. As you can see in the link above, the actual AMS-IX roughly has a 6 Tb/s throughput. 

    Since they don't have this amount of bandwidth, the ISP has to deal with bandwidth management and they do this by something called traffic shaping. They have multiple traffic ques for different types of traffic, each having their own priority level. My ISP in Europe for example, they offer free VOIP between customers. You don't want this to be laggy, so this will be prioritized highest. Furthermore, the ISP's believe that a regular customer will simply spend most time downloading stuff, surfing the internet and watch streaming content etc. Their traffic shaping algorithms are optimized towards that. You can tell simply by the fact that download is much higher than upload on most residential connections. So while traffic is filling their traffic ques, the shaping algorithm decides what to send out and what to buffer. When the buffer is full, traffic simply gets dropped (the idea behind bufferbloat as often discussed on these forums)

    Gaming traffic is UDP traffic. And generally is just one way traffic. One reason why a ISP likes to put UDP traffic in the very lowest priority que, is that when a packet is dropped it is simply ignored after, the sender simply sends the next packet. TCP on the other hand, sends a packet, awaits confirmation from the receiver and then sends the next. So if the original sender doesn't get this confirmation, it will simply resend the packet. This is why network operators choose to drop or delay UDP traffic. Once it's gone it's gone. TCP traffic will be resend over and over and if there is any sort of congestion issue dropping TCP packets will simply make this worse. 

    Also, since different traffic has different priorities, you have to look at how ping is calculated in game or by a website etc. Is it physically sending a ICMP request, or does it do what sites like DSL reports do, send a HTTP get request and time how long it takes to get an answer? These things are all different. Point being here is that while you can have a great ping in game, it's a different traffic class than UDP gaming traffic. So while your ping might look great, your gaming traffic can be lagging all over the place since this is qued and buffered differently. 
    When your traffic arrives at the backbone, largely the same thing will happen, your traffic is prioritized and gaming traffic is once again in the lowest tier. Every hop to the server will have it's own traffic ques and traffic shaping schemes. All the way up to the server complex.

    So this lag comp people speak of? Following the above. Latency for UDP traffic can be very different than ping suggests but can also be more unstable due to buffering etc. What is more annoying, is that it can also be asymmetric. Since most ISP's provide asymmetrical connections, their traffic shaping model across their network will follow a similar model. What's happening when the famous "Lag comp is against me" occurs? Your real-time UDP latency on download is higher than on your upload to the server. If you have read the article about lag compensation at the start, it will be obvious by now. When this occurs, your traffic reaches the server faster than you are gettig the gamestate updates from the server. And thus you will appear at your enemies screen before they appear on yours. And they seem to shoot you in a nanosecond. Some players try to influence this by clogging their upload on purpose, so they delay upload to the server. 

    Fine example of exactly this happening to me a few days ago:
    You can see he was clearly not on the screen when I was taking damage.

    This mainly why you get a different feel for the connection every time you play, or even from game to game or half way the game. You can control your own network, but next to you and the host, there is at least 3 other different parties involved who have a influence on the quality of your traffic. It makes me chuckle when some Youtuber connects up router A and afterwards router B and decides on feel that one or the other is better because he had a slightly faster hit detection in one of the games.

    Also, when you are setting up your network, and follow the directions for setting up anti-bufferbloat, you're simulating a fully loaded internet connection. Most of the time when playing, this is not the case. When I play CoD and I have my DumaOS screen open, I generally have a traffic load of 0.5 Mb/s on a 300/300 Mb/s connection. Bufferbloat is absolutely not going to be an issue no matter what you set the sliders to. 

    When is all this important? QoS and anti bufferbloat is simply important if you have a low upload connection, or better said low compared to your usage. On a connection with 10/20 Mb/s upload, a phone simply syncing can already congest your network. This is where you need to have your bufferbloat and QoS set up right. If you are using a 1000/1000 Mb/s connection this is of very little interest. QoS will do very little for you here. You read about people complaining that they are using 1000/1000 Mb/s internet and still have a crappy game. Thats simply because traffic coming from their network is simply still affected by traffic shaping between their ISP, backbone and server and this is not any different than any other connection.

    Geofilter is the prime functionality for R1 and DumaOS routers for me. It simply makes sure that you are connected to the closest server. I measured ping across Europe. To Amsterdam I get 8ms, to Italy 28ms. If you were to have a game that was truly having 28ms latency, it would be perfectly playable. It's only that from Amsterdam to Italy, there is so many extra hops in the traffic route that the chance of you meeting over congestion is exponentially growing. As geofiltering limits your matchmaking, you have to find a balance here between connectivity and quality. Typically in Europe I have Amsterdam, Frankfurt and London in my filter giving 8-15ms ping. Paris for some odd reason gives 25ms and always has a lower game quality. 

    I have friends that use R1 routers and mess about with the sliders every day and they can never get it right either. That's because it's impossible to get it right and it's all pissing in the wind. If you have a setting that gives you a clean line without bufferbloat, then you did all you can do and the rest is simply out of your hands.

    Other settings? DNS, MTU? Is all BS. Set it to what your provider defaults and done. It's all snake oil. I swapped my XR500 for my R1 once to do some testing, forgot to update the connection setting in the PS4 and it was pointing to a non functional DNS adress. And the game ran fine. I only found out because I went to upload a video afterwards and it was coming up with DNS errors. So conclusion here is also it doesn't matter which DNS you use.
  2. Like
    RedBull2k reacted to Mement in XR500 and Vigor 130 GUI   
    Access a Vigor130 in Bridge Mode
    Get the DSL Information from the Vigor130 on WAN
     
  3. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Zippy in Please read this everyone now for cod mw2019   
    simply use the data from geo filter to find server,  then strip out the data,  to get sport-dport apply that to hyper lane, and then when no longer detected remove. and repeat.
     
  4. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from roadrunner in Please read this everyone now for cod mw2019   
    simply use the data from geo filter to find server,  then strip out the data,  to get sport-dport apply that to hyper lane, and then when no longer detected remove. and repeat.
     
  5. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from VIPER51 in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    Bugs creep in even when you have had a particular feature working correctly before... so my update is Bug squashing at the moment
  6. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from TryHardUndies in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    good news, 
  7. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from KTM in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    good news, 
  8. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Netduma Admin in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    good news, 
  9. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Alex49H in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    good news, 
  10. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from designiconline in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    good news, 
  11. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from simjc in Announcement: DumaOS on Netduma R1 in Final Beta Testing   
    good news, 
  12. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Victor-Yout in Interleaving?   
    fast path= if you receive an error'd packet you will drop it.
    interleave = if you receive an error'd packet it attempts to fix it. 
     
    how each scenario would play out in a game would be interesting.
  13. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from N3CR0 in Create your own cod   
    Season pass needs to be adjusted, 1 extra map per dlc and only 3 dlc. = more time on new dlc. for the last couple of years now the 4th dlc hasn't really be utilized because of the time they give you before the new game comes out
  14. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Netduma Jack in ww2 new servers   
    well i seen them the other night, i made a small program, it extracts a list of ips my ps4 is in communication with and then applying some logic to strip out the server ip.
  15. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Netduma Fraser in Major Announcement: Netduma partner with NETGEAR to launch the Nighthawk XR500 Gaming Router   
    Just to confirm having been with plusnet, you can use any 3rd party hardware but they wont offer any support, Plusnet use PPPoE, so you would have to fill in your username etc ("[email protected]") the xr500 offers PPPoE so does your R1.
  16. Like
  17. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from ColonicBoom in Cake and Eat it   
    Yes Im here to complain. Just imagine your blind folded and your given a piece of your favorite cake in your hand, now the object is to eat it, easy right!
    Now imagine you have been playing cod for a few years and your given the task of aiming on a person and shooting, easy right!
    well the first sentence is easy enough.
    but here is an example at about 8 seconds, the target is hard to aim on and shoot, it may be just me but this is happening all the time. Is there something broken? Dont get me wrong i have had some issues with other COD titles but this is annoying me. just thought I would share and vent
     
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cC7BcvMjbLY
  18. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from RADDY1993 in sky q   
    check your wifi on duma, change the channel to a lower number, and also check to see if security mode is WPA-PSK2, i have had trouble with devices trying to authenticate using WPA-PSK.
     
    I see you got it sorted.
  19. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Netduma Jack in Geo filter   
    yes you can, you will have to update host filtering with your wifi device as it uses a different mac to you lan adapter
  20. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from fuzzy clam in Competition is heating up in the gaming router space!   
    on the gb page https://www.linksys.com/gb/p/P-WRT32X/ there is a little more to read and it talks about consoles being ideal in a lan party.
  21. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from fuzzy clam in Port 30130 for CoD?   
    I just think maybe that port 30130 was an internal port being used by upnp as your device had changed its ip resulting in port 3074 not available. Solution would be use the ip address that has already opened up port 3074 you will see which device it is at the upnp page on your gui
  22. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from thegaurdian1 in Competition is heating up in the gaming router space!   
    on the gb page https://www.linksys.com/gb/p/P-WRT32X/ there is a little more to read and it talks about consoles being ideal in a lan party.
  23. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from Netduma Fraser in Geo Filter , cpu usage   
    to answer ill use your post
     
    if auto ping is enabled and  browser closed(or not pointing at host filtering) then auto ping does not run. from my testing
     
    i guess it matters to original poster  as now he knows that certain things do not run while not pointed at host filtering, i guess less things running - less CPU
  24. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from GregyP3 in need help internet bad or netduma set up wrong ?   
    Im with plusnet so id recommend them
  25. Like
    RedBull2k got a reaction from ColonicBoom in need help internet bad or netduma set up wrong ?   
    Im with plusnet so id recommend them
×
×
  • Create New...