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Bert

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  1. Like
    Bert got a reaction from MathewP in My ISP upgraded internet to 2 gig but My R2 will only put out 1 gig speeds?   
    @BIG_DOG
     
    Actually for the better router's it coming.
     
    Many have a 10Gbit and 2,5Gbit port. So then you would have 2,5Gbit WAN and need to hook up a 10Gbit switch
  2. Like
    Bert got a reaction from N3CR0 in My ISP upgraded internet to 2 gig but My R2 will only put out 1 gig speeds?   
    Because the ports on the router are 1Gbit.
     
    You need a router with 2.5Gbit ports to run 2Gbit internet, or something that supports link aggregation.
     
    Also probably the CPU's can't do QoS at 2Gbit speeds.
  3. Like
    Bert got a reaction from BIG__DOG in QOS for Google Meet video/audio calls   
    Use a manual / advanced configuration.
     
    Protocol UDP
    Source: 19302 - 19309
    Destination 1-65535
  4. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Harley in Traffic Prioritization   
    It's a tradeoff really.
     
    Adding high, medium and low is not so simple as it requires at least 3 sending queues, one for each category. And since DumaOS attempts to QoS in both directions you would also need them on the LAN side.
     
    Adding more queues simply degrades hardware performance as it requires stronger CPU's.
     
    In this way, DumaOS basicly has 2 queues in each direction, what you add in traffic prio is high, rest is low.
     
    These routers are meant for gamers, that have a PC and console and a few more devices. They are not meant for complex environments with loads of clients and a lot of services.
  5. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Netduma Fraser in Traffic Prioritization   
    It's a tradeoff really.
     
    Adding high, medium and low is not so simple as it requires at least 3 sending queues, one for each category. And since DumaOS attempts to QoS in both directions you would also need them on the LAN side.
     
    Adding more queues simply degrades hardware performance as it requires stronger CPU's.
     
    In this way, DumaOS basicly has 2 queues in each direction, what you add in traffic prio is high, rest is low.
     
    These routers are meant for gamers, that have a PC and console and a few more devices. They are not meant for complex environments with loads of clients and a lot of services.
  6. Like
    Bert got a reaction from N3CR0 in Share Your Netduma Settings For MW/CW/WZ   
    If you played a few rounds and did well SBMM is most likely also going to get the best of you.
     
    If you're on console, playing with crossplay on vs PC players can be quite a handfull. I play MW and CW on PC now and there is quite a difference in performance.
  7. Like
    Bert got a reaction from UK Sentinel in vigor 130   
    No I have cable modem in bridge connected straight to XR700, using DHCP. Before I had XR700 then I used XR500 in that spot, works the same. So no double NAT.
  8. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Newfie in Considering buying a netduma   
    To be honest, last week or so I have been exclusively playing PC. Turn crossplay on, no filtering. Turn on auto sprint and just go blasting. Play some trance music in the background. Sometimes I get 30-30 sometimes i get 50-5 lol.
     
    Don't care about SBMM, don't care on who plays mouse or controller or whatever.
  9. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Netduma Fraser in R1 Max Download and Upload Speeds   
    R1 did 330/330 or so for me, 680 mbit with QoS disabled.
  10. Confused
    Bert got a reaction from Gamer_93 in Need Optimal Settings   
    Clear your deny list. Set geofilter in the middle of the ocean with strict mode on, and set geofilter to 30-40.
  11. Like
    Bert got a reaction from N3CR0 in Significantly Lowering Your MTU Reduce Upload Latency in COD (WZ/MW/CW)?   
    Lowering MTU is a trick from the old days, generally it was done on very weak upload connections.
     
    if you think about latency, latency is a function of bandwidth. If a full Ethernet frame is beeing sent and your game packet is waiting for that. Say you have 1mbit upload, 1500 bytes takes 0,012s to send. Cutting your MTU to 750 here will take only 0,006s to send. However now you are on gigabit upload, the same Ethernet frame takes 0,000012s to send, 750 would take 0,000006s to send, aka trivial.
     
    downside is that the cpu on your gateway / modem needs to process a lot more and becomes a bottleneck in some cases. This is why running torrents and VPN is so bad on the Intel Puma series. The CPUs collapse under so many small packets.
     
  12. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Kwee in Exploring PC side adapter properties & QoS 4 dummies   
    Adapter properties really depend on what equipment you have. Not only the NIC but also your CPU etc, switches you attach to etc.
     
    I have found that for 1Gbit nearly everything works and you don't need to do a lot of tuning. It's when you start upscaling to 10Gbit for example when things get interesting.
     
    On that guide Fraser mentiones for example:
     
    Jumbo Frames is not needed for 1Gbit and especially not when your PC is directly connected to your router with no internal file transfers taking place. It basicly sets your maximum MTU to 9000. Most internetproviders use 1500 or 1486 or 1522 etc depending if you use PPPoE etc so your router doesn't use jumboframes anyway. Best is to turn it off. MTU auto discovery should take care of things but if it doesn't you will get packet fragmentation. If you want to use jumbo frames, you need other equipment on your network to support it as well, ie switches and so on. I have it turned off since my file transfers are fast enough without it.
     
    RSS scaling. You can turn it on or off. It means that recieving data is distributed along the cores of the CPU instead of single core. For 1Gbit this does not pose an issue but for 10Gbit again here things get interesting. My I7-2600 Win 2016 server box pulls 30% CPU load under transfers and RSS scaling is needed as otherwise it maxes out a single CPU core. For RSS queues you want to set it equal to the amount of physical cores you are using, not the amount of threads used. My i7 has 4 physical cores so I set 4 Queues, my AMD system is 16 core so uses 8, max setting in the driver. Aquantia NICs are set to 8 by default and I had a lot of issues with that. Basicly file transfer speeds were all over the place recieving to my i7 box, with the driver set to 8. I then turned it off for starters. That went well for a while until I started using Hyper-V hosts, ran out of CPU cyclces and needed it on. Then found that the Queues needed to be set to 4. 10850k is a 10 core system so setting max here is no issue.
     
    Select speed. You NEED to set this to auto negotiation as you can have a lot of issues if both sides don't support setting physical speeds, the adapter will default to 100/half if you run into issues here.
     
    Flow control I generally leave it off and also interrupt moderation off. Flow control needs to be supported by sender and reciever and also the switch in between. interrupt moderation slows you down when network transfers start using too many CPU cycles. My AMD system is fast enough and on my i7 server using a lot of CPU cycles is kinda the point.
     
    Offloading tasks generally leave them on unless there is issues with large transfers.
     
    QoS on PC can be set, but I generally don't. It attaches DiffServ tags but again here your other equipment needs to support it. I'm not sure if the XR routers effectively use DiffServ tags. I use DiffServ on my main switch, it automatically tags traffic on ports 3074-3076 and gives them their own priority lane. Otherwise if your switches or routers don't support DiffServ or DSCP tags it's a moot point. Some unmanaged switches from NetGear for example don't allow setting tags but will honor the tags. Setting it on my switch ensures both PS4 an PC can use the QoS over the switch. There is many guides on how you can set it in windows, just search "Set DSCP tags in windows" in google. You need to set the "Expidited Forwarding" flag if you want to use it for CoD.
     
    Also sometimes overlooked is the Windows power profile. I found that in Win10, using the balanced power profile with minimum CPU set to 0%, incoming file transfers didn't properly turbo up the CPU, it stayed running 1.6GHz instead of 3.4GHz baseclock and this slowed the transfer enormously. Setting it to 50% still displayed some delay so I set it to 100% all the time. Incidentally I checked it's power consumption with a watt meter and there is no difference in idling on 1.6GHz vs idling on 3.4GHz when it comes to power consumption. Again for 1Gbit this is probably not an issue but at 10Gbit vs a lower end CPU it is. When your file transfers start slow, you can check this on the target machine. 
  13. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Sgt-Greco in The vanguard alpha thread   
    That is actually also what I find the biggest downsides.
     
    Healing is too slow and half the time I get killed in a corner hiding because my screen is still red and waiting for health.
     
    Also the visibility when shooting is horrible.
  14. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Newfie in SQM?   
    At 1Gbit up and down you should switch off QoS entirely unless you use a huge amount of bandwidth.
     
    QoS is the thing that is probably least understood by gamers but it does for sure sell routers. If you are not reaching the maximum of your connection then there is no packets stuck in the queue and QoS will not do anything for you.
     
    Also say you have 500mbit. You go testing bufferbloat, adjust it to 400mbit. Great but if you are using the net by yourself and your average traffic use while gaming is 1mbit instead of downloading stuff, here QoS will again do nothing for you.
     
    QoS actually slows down your traffic in terms of latency. Generally this little bit of latency is accepted by getting constant performance in return. A household with kids going off a 100/10 connection or so needs QoS but not at 1000/1000.
     
    And yes for 1Gbit SQM you need a lot of CPU power. As far as I know only x86-64 routers are capable of doing this at this present time.
  15. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Newfie in XR700 is not reaching the 940Mbps speed on the WAN Port   
    I have run 10Gbit through 5E cables so the generic off Amazon cat 7 and cat 8 cables are not worth it to waste money on. Get a good cat 5E or 6 cable and be done with it. Only time I would go 6A or higher is for fixed installations in walls etc. Patch cords are cheap enough to replace when you need it.
     
    First or all there is no true cat 7 or cat 8 cables for sale at that price.
     
    The cable body is hopefully made from cable conforming to the cat 7 or cat 8 spec. On most of these braided cables you can’t even check. The connectors however, to conform to true cat 7/8 spec you need special connectors which are hugely expensive and not generally used on these cables.
     
    Spec for these cables is for 100m distance, actually 90 meters + 2x 5m patchcords. So if these cables don’t meet spec nobody is able to prove this in the first place since 99.9% will be used for 1Gbit connections where you can also run 5E.
     
    Also gold plated connectors. The STP connectors are there to block EMI and need a full shielded cable. So using gold has no advantage here. Run away from these.
     
    Tdlr, het anything off your local store and be done with it.
  16. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Locosano in Exploring PC side adapter properties & QoS 4 dummies   
    Adapter properties really depend on what equipment you have. Not only the NIC but also your CPU etc, switches you attach to etc.
     
    I have found that for 1Gbit nearly everything works and you don't need to do a lot of tuning. It's when you start upscaling to 10Gbit for example when things get interesting.
     
    On that guide Fraser mentiones for example:
     
    Jumbo Frames is not needed for 1Gbit and especially not when your PC is directly connected to your router with no internal file transfers taking place. It basicly sets your maximum MTU to 9000. Most internetproviders use 1500 or 1486 or 1522 etc depending if you use PPPoE etc so your router doesn't use jumboframes anyway. Best is to turn it off. MTU auto discovery should take care of things but if it doesn't you will get packet fragmentation. If you want to use jumbo frames, you need other equipment on your network to support it as well, ie switches and so on. I have it turned off since my file transfers are fast enough without it.
     
    RSS scaling. You can turn it on or off. It means that recieving data is distributed along the cores of the CPU instead of single core. For 1Gbit this does not pose an issue but for 10Gbit again here things get interesting. My I7-2600 Win 2016 server box pulls 30% CPU load under transfers and RSS scaling is needed as otherwise it maxes out a single CPU core. For RSS queues you want to set it equal to the amount of physical cores you are using, not the amount of threads used. My i7 has 4 physical cores so I set 4 Queues, my AMD system is 16 core so uses 8, max setting in the driver. Aquantia NICs are set to 8 by default and I had a lot of issues with that. Basicly file transfer speeds were all over the place recieving to my i7 box, with the driver set to 8. I then turned it off for starters. That went well for a while until I started using Hyper-V hosts, ran out of CPU cyclces and needed it on. Then found that the Queues needed to be set to 4. 10850k is a 10 core system so setting max here is no issue.
     
    Select speed. You NEED to set this to auto negotiation as you can have a lot of issues if both sides don't support setting physical speeds, the adapter will default to 100/half if you run into issues here.
     
    Flow control I generally leave it off and also interrupt moderation off. Flow control needs to be supported by sender and reciever and also the switch in between. interrupt moderation slows you down when network transfers start using too many CPU cycles. My AMD system is fast enough and on my i7 server using a lot of CPU cycles is kinda the point.
     
    Offloading tasks generally leave them on unless there is issues with large transfers.
     
    QoS on PC can be set, but I generally don't. It attaches DiffServ tags but again here your other equipment needs to support it. I'm not sure if the XR routers effectively use DiffServ tags. I use DiffServ on my main switch, it automatically tags traffic on ports 3074-3076 and gives them their own priority lane. Otherwise if your switches or routers don't support DiffServ or DSCP tags it's a moot point. Some unmanaged switches from NetGear for example don't allow setting tags but will honor the tags. Setting it on my switch ensures both PS4 an PC can use the QoS over the switch. There is many guides on how you can set it in windows, just search "Set DSCP tags in windows" in google. You need to set the "Expidited Forwarding" flag if you want to use it for CoD.
     
    Also sometimes overlooked is the Windows power profile. I found that in Win10, using the balanced power profile with minimum CPU set to 0%, incoming file transfers didn't properly turbo up the CPU, it stayed running 1.6GHz instead of 3.4GHz baseclock and this slowed the transfer enormously. Setting it to 50% still displayed some delay so I set it to 100% all the time. Incidentally I checked it's power consumption with a watt meter and there is no difference in idling on 1.6GHz vs idling on 3.4GHz when it comes to power consumption. Again for 1Gbit this is probably not an issue but at 10Gbit vs a lower end CPU it is. When your file transfers start slow, you can check this on the target machine. 
  17. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Netduma Fraser in Exploring PC side adapter properties & QoS 4 dummies   
    Adapter properties really depend on what equipment you have. Not only the NIC but also your CPU etc, switches you attach to etc.
     
    I have found that for 1Gbit nearly everything works and you don't need to do a lot of tuning. It's when you start upscaling to 10Gbit for example when things get interesting.
     
    On that guide Fraser mentiones for example:
     
    Jumbo Frames is not needed for 1Gbit and especially not when your PC is directly connected to your router with no internal file transfers taking place. It basicly sets your maximum MTU to 9000. Most internetproviders use 1500 or 1486 or 1522 etc depending if you use PPPoE etc so your router doesn't use jumboframes anyway. Best is to turn it off. MTU auto discovery should take care of things but if it doesn't you will get packet fragmentation. If you want to use jumbo frames, you need other equipment on your network to support it as well, ie switches and so on. I have it turned off since my file transfers are fast enough without it.
     
    RSS scaling. You can turn it on or off. It means that recieving data is distributed along the cores of the CPU instead of single core. For 1Gbit this does not pose an issue but for 10Gbit again here things get interesting. My I7-2600 Win 2016 server box pulls 30% CPU load under transfers and RSS scaling is needed as otherwise it maxes out a single CPU core. For RSS queues you want to set it equal to the amount of physical cores you are using, not the amount of threads used. My i7 has 4 physical cores so I set 4 Queues, my AMD system is 16 core so uses 8, max setting in the driver. Aquantia NICs are set to 8 by default and I had a lot of issues with that. Basicly file transfer speeds were all over the place recieving to my i7 box, with the driver set to 8. I then turned it off for starters. That went well for a while until I started using Hyper-V hosts, ran out of CPU cyclces and needed it on. Then found that the Queues needed to be set to 4. 10850k is a 10 core system so setting max here is no issue.
     
    Select speed. You NEED to set this to auto negotiation as you can have a lot of issues if both sides don't support setting physical speeds, the adapter will default to 100/half if you run into issues here.
     
    Flow control I generally leave it off and also interrupt moderation off. Flow control needs to be supported by sender and reciever and also the switch in between. interrupt moderation slows you down when network transfers start using too many CPU cycles. My AMD system is fast enough and on my i7 server using a lot of CPU cycles is kinda the point.
     
    Offloading tasks generally leave them on unless there is issues with large transfers.
     
    QoS on PC can be set, but I generally don't. It attaches DiffServ tags but again here your other equipment needs to support it. I'm not sure if the XR routers effectively use DiffServ tags. I use DiffServ on my main switch, it automatically tags traffic on ports 3074-3076 and gives them their own priority lane. Otherwise if your switches or routers don't support DiffServ or DSCP tags it's a moot point. Some unmanaged switches from NetGear for example don't allow setting tags but will honor the tags. Setting it on my switch ensures both PS4 an PC can use the QoS over the switch. There is many guides on how you can set it in windows, just search "Set DSCP tags in windows" in google. You need to set the "Expidited Forwarding" flag if you want to use it for CoD.
     
    Also sometimes overlooked is the Windows power profile. I found that in Win10, using the balanced power profile with minimum CPU set to 0%, incoming file transfers didn't properly turbo up the CPU, it stayed running 1.6GHz instead of 3.4GHz baseclock and this slowed the transfer enormously. Setting it to 50% still displayed some delay so I set it to 100% all the time. Incidentally I checked it's power consumption with a watt meter and there is no difference in idling on 1.6GHz vs idling on 3.4GHz when it comes to power consumption. Again for 1Gbit this is probably not an issue but at 10Gbit vs a lower end CPU it is. When your file transfers start slow, you can check this on the target machine. 
  18. Like
    Bert reacted to jawntronix in Exploring PC side adapter properties & QoS 4 dummies   
    @Bert, Much appreciated, thank you for the rundown on these!
  19. Like
    Bert got a reaction from jawntronix in Exploring PC side adapter properties & QoS 4 dummies   
    Adapter properties really depend on what equipment you have. Not only the NIC but also your CPU etc, switches you attach to etc.
     
    I have found that for 1Gbit nearly everything works and you don't need to do a lot of tuning. It's when you start upscaling to 10Gbit for example when things get interesting.
     
    On that guide Fraser mentiones for example:
     
    Jumbo Frames is not needed for 1Gbit and especially not when your PC is directly connected to your router with no internal file transfers taking place. It basicly sets your maximum MTU to 9000. Most internetproviders use 1500 or 1486 or 1522 etc depending if you use PPPoE etc so your router doesn't use jumboframes anyway. Best is to turn it off. MTU auto discovery should take care of things but if it doesn't you will get packet fragmentation. If you want to use jumbo frames, you need other equipment on your network to support it as well, ie switches and so on. I have it turned off since my file transfers are fast enough without it.
     
    RSS scaling. You can turn it on or off. It means that recieving data is distributed along the cores of the CPU instead of single core. For 1Gbit this does not pose an issue but for 10Gbit again here things get interesting. My I7-2600 Win 2016 server box pulls 30% CPU load under transfers and RSS scaling is needed as otherwise it maxes out a single CPU core. For RSS queues you want to set it equal to the amount of physical cores you are using, not the amount of threads used. My i7 has 4 physical cores so I set 4 Queues, my AMD system is 16 core so uses 8, max setting in the driver. Aquantia NICs are set to 8 by default and I had a lot of issues with that. Basicly file transfer speeds were all over the place recieving to my i7 box, with the driver set to 8. I then turned it off for starters. That went well for a while until I started using Hyper-V hosts, ran out of CPU cyclces and needed it on. Then found that the Queues needed to be set to 4. 10850k is a 10 core system so setting max here is no issue.
     
    Select speed. You NEED to set this to auto negotiation as you can have a lot of issues if both sides don't support setting physical speeds, the adapter will default to 100/half if you run into issues here.
     
    Flow control I generally leave it off and also interrupt moderation off. Flow control needs to be supported by sender and reciever and also the switch in between. interrupt moderation slows you down when network transfers start using too many CPU cycles. My AMD system is fast enough and on my i7 server using a lot of CPU cycles is kinda the point.
     
    Offloading tasks generally leave them on unless there is issues with large transfers.
     
    QoS on PC can be set, but I generally don't. It attaches DiffServ tags but again here your other equipment needs to support it. I'm not sure if the XR routers effectively use DiffServ tags. I use DiffServ on my main switch, it automatically tags traffic on ports 3074-3076 and gives them their own priority lane. Otherwise if your switches or routers don't support DiffServ or DSCP tags it's a moot point. Some unmanaged switches from NetGear for example don't allow setting tags but will honor the tags. Setting it on my switch ensures both PS4 an PC can use the QoS over the switch. There is many guides on how you can set it in windows, just search "Set DSCP tags in windows" in google. You need to set the "Expidited Forwarding" flag if you want to use it for CoD.
     
    Also sometimes overlooked is the Windows power profile. I found that in Win10, using the balanced power profile with minimum CPU set to 0%, incoming file transfers didn't properly turbo up the CPU, it stayed running 1.6GHz instead of 3.4GHz baseclock and this slowed the transfer enormously. Setting it to 50% still displayed some delay so I set it to 100% all the time. Incidentally I checked it's power consumption with a watt meter and there is no difference in idling on 1.6GHz vs idling on 3.4GHz when it comes to power consumption. Again for 1Gbit this is probably not an issue but at 10Gbit vs a lower end CPU it is. When your file transfers start slow, you can check this on the target machine. 
  20. Like
    Bert got a reaction from GBDJG in Second router.   
    If you turn off NAT on the NG router it will probably just become pass through again, so you are in the same situation as having it in AP mode.
     
    If you set it in router mode you need to keep DHCP active as you need something to give the devices behind the NG a IP adress. Also you might want to change the subnet.
     
    So for Example:
    R2 = 192.168.77.1 for IP
    NG = 192.168.1.1 for IP
     
    Normally most routers have 192.168.1.1 for default and they would bite eachother, but since R2 has 192.168.77.1 it should be ok.
  21. Like
    Bert got a reaction from GBDJG in Second router.   
    The way you have it connected now, as AP, creates a bridge to the switch ports as well, so it becomes pass through.
     
    If you put it back in router mode, your R2 should see it as 1 device. But you will have double NAT on the devices behind the R2. You can possibly solve this by putting it in DMZ on the R2 if it has this option.
     
    It does create some hassles, like the devices behind the Netgear device can talk to devices on your network, but you won't be able to have your R2 network able to talk to devices behind the Netgear router due to it's firewall beeing active.
  22. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Newfie in Netgear XR1000 wifi speeds   
    How are you testing this file transfer?
     
    One thing that is new in Windows nowadays is write back caching. So when you transfer a file, it goes to windows memory at full speed and then slowly gets written onto the target device.
     
    One thing is that most external devices do not use write back caching.
     
    Other thing is that when you are copying files and you inmediately try to copy them back, the file isn't fully written to the drive yet resulting in very slow transfers.
     
    Another thing is that write back cache in win 10 is limited to 1GB. So if you exceed that the transfer will slow down.
     
    What I would actually suggest is using iPerf3. Use it on both clients and then test bandwidth. Preferrably, run it on your wired PC as server and use the wifi devices as client.
  23. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Fuzy in Internal Streaming   
    It has worked fine for me actually. Just turning on SMB 1.0 on your PC shows them in Network Neighborhood a little easier.
     
    Speeds are actually not too bad either. I get about 85MB/S in router mode off the XR500, in AP mode it did about 100-110 MB/s. XR700 seemed to top out at 200 MB/s.
     
    I am using a Windows 2016 server box now for NAS/Media/etc as it has much higher performance but for a simple media player / file sharing service it will do the job.
  24. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Netduma Fraser in Internal Streaming   
    You can't because the stream never reaches the router.
     
    It goes -> SMB share -> Switch chip -> TV
     
    Generally a stream doesn't use more than 30mbit, unless your forwarding etc.
  25. Like
    Bert got a reaction from Netduma Liam in Internal Streaming   
    You can't because the stream never reaches the router.
     
    It goes -> SMB share -> Switch chip -> TV
     
    Generally a stream doesn't use more than 30mbit, unless your forwarding etc.
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