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Can a shorter or better dsl cable to your modem lower your ping or speed up your connection? Or a lan cable? I am not a specialist, could be a dumb question

 

It's not a dumb question at all, and it's absolutely right - shorter cables can reduce your ping though the difference will be very slight. You'll only notice it if your cable is really long at the minute. The length of the Ethernet between the Netduma and the Modem makes a difference too - it's all on the same principle as the Geo-Filter: the more distance there is, the higher your ping.

 

Useful if you want to shave of 1ms!

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It's not a dumb question at all, and it's absolutely right - shorter cables can reduce your ping though the difference will be very slight. You'll only notice it if your cable is really long at the minute. The length of the Ethernet between the Netduma and the Modem makes a difference too - it's all on the same principle as the Geo-Filter: the more distance there is, the higher your ping.

 

Useful if you want to shave of 1ms!

Ok thanks.

What would be better for my console.

Two ways for me:

1: xr500 is connected with a longer cable to my modem, but is placed in my room and has a short lan cable connected to my console.

2: xr500 is placed next to my modem with a short cable, but there is a longer cable that connects the console and xr500

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Ok thanks.

What would be better for my console.

Two ways for me:

1: xr500 is connected with a longer cable to my modem, but is placed in my room and has a short lan cable connected to my console.

2: xr500 is placed next to my modem with a short cable, but there is a longer cable that connects the console and xr500

the shorter the dsl cable the better. The ethernet to the console is less important so long as it is of good quality and not kinked. The dsl cable length is the most important, a cable of 1mtr is advisable!

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Ok thanks.

What would be better for my console.

Two ways for me:

1: xr500 is connected with a longer cable to my modem, but is placed in my room and has a short lan cable connected to my console.

2: xr500 is placed next to my modem with a short cable, but there is a longer cable that connects the console and xr500

 

Mine is connected with a slightly longer cable between my modem and router, then a shorter cable between my router and Xbox. Which also means it's easy to plug in an ethernet for my laptop if I want to test (because the router isn't in a different room to my Xbox).

 

I don't know if it makes any difference but I was paranoid that the router shouldn't be right next to the modem, just in case it was radiating magnetic interference (or something like that).

 

I've no idea if it does that though, it probably doesn't.

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Mine is connected with a slightly longer cable between my modem and router, then a shorter cable between my router and Xbox. Which also means it's easy to plug in an ethernet for my laptop if I want to test (because the router isn't in a different room to my Xbox).

 

I don't know if it makes any difference but I was paranoid that the router shouldn't be right next to the modem, just in case it was radiating magnetic interference (or something like that).

 

I've no idea if it does that though, it probably doesn't.

This is what I do. When I signed up with BT the guy who got me online ran an extension from master socket (near the front door, nowhere near any power sockets) to the living room under a double power socket, so I could connect my modem easily. I have a 0.5m DSL cable from wall to modem, then 15m of cat6 FTP ethernet to my R1 upstairs so I can run a shorter ethernet to my PS4. I've tried playing downstairs with a short ethernet from modem to R1 and then another short one to the PS4, and it doesn't seem to make a difference.

 

DSL cables seem to lose signal strength very easily over short distances (the unshielded ribbon cables that come with modems at up to 3m length are terrible), but even cat5 ethernet is good for 100m assuming no issues with EMI etc.

 

"Cat6a supports bandwidth frequencies of up to 500 MHz, twice the amount of Cat6 cable, and can also support 10Gbps like its predecessor. However, unlike Cat6 cabling, Cat6a can support 10 Gigabit Ethernet at 100 meters. [Cat6 cabling on the other hand, can transmit the same speeds at up to 37 meters.]"

 

The ideal setup would be wall - short DSL cable - modem - short ethernet cable - R1 - short ethernet cable - device. If that's not possible and you need more reach, you should work backwards from device to R1 with a longer ethernet cable, and if necessary the next best step would be to use a long cable from R1 to modem.

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This is what I do. When I signed up with BT the guy who got me online ran an extension from master socket (near the front door, nowhere near any power sockets) to the living room under a double power socket, so I could connect my modem easily. I have a 0.5m DSL cable from wall to modem, then 15m of cat6 FTP ethernet to my R1 upstairs so I can run a shorter ethernet to my PS4. I've tried playing downstairs with a short ethernet from modem to R1 and then another short one to the PS4, and it doesn't seem to make a difference.

 

DSL cables seem to lose signal strength very easily over short distances (the unshielded ribbon cables that come with modems at up to 3m length are terrible), but even cat5 ethernet is good for 100m assuming no issues with EMI etc.

 

"Cat6a supports bandwidth frequencies of up to 500 MHz, twice the amount of Cat6 cable, and can also support 10Gbps like its predecessor. However, unlike Cat6 cabling, Cat6a can support 10 Gigabit Ethernet at 100 meters. [Cat6 cabling on the other hand, can transmit the same speeds at up to 37 meters.]"

 

The ideal setup would be wall - short DSL cable - modem - short ethernet cable - R1 - short ethernet cable - device. If that's not possible and you need more reach, you should work backwards from device to R1 with a longer ethernet cable, and if necessary the next best step would be to use a long cable from R1 to modem.

when I had my bt line fitted by BT 3 years ago when I left virgin the BT engineer said "I will place it here by your front door" I said "no you won't, you will place it where I tell you to please" right by my desk which is in the middle of the house :)

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when I had my bt line fitted by BT 3 years ago when I left virgin the BT engineer said "I will place it here by your front door" I said "no you won't, you will place it where I tell you to please" right by my desk which is in the middle of the house :)

Haha the bloke that visited me offered to put it there before I could even suggest a spot. I didn't even know we had an existing BT socket - I took a closer look when he pointed it out, and it had an old BT logo I never recognised, apparently used from 80 to 91 like the one below. Didn't think my house was even that old LOL

post-9329-0-64674200-1528323495_thumb.png

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