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Pete

My best settings at the moment, future with 5G, and other opinions. This is NOT a support thread but an opinion and discussion thread.

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First of all I would like to hear opinions about the implications of 5G internet on gaming and lag compensation. From what I have read, 5G is supposed to offer gigabit internet with no more than 1 ms round trip latency. If that is true and everyone has less than 1 ms ping would that make the need for lag compensation obsolete?

 

 

My best settings at the moment (Call of Duty on Xbox One):

Disclaimer: My wife went out of town for a couple of weeks so my network is not as stressed as it normally would be. But it allowed me to do a lot of testing for the first time since I got the XR500. 

 

Leave all settings as default except:

1) Uncheck (turn off) all high priority traffic even the dumaos classified games.

2) For the Anit-Bufferbloat sliders, click apply Never.

 

Just try it for an hour or more and see if it helps.

 

Extra tip for call of duty, don't set your sensitivity too high. Maybe I just wasn't good enough for high sensitivity but it seems to me that hit registration improved when I lowered my sensitivity from "very high" to "high". 

Note that I'm a more cautious player so the reduced sensitivity is less of an impact than it would probably be for an aggressive player. Move around but don't rush is my battlecry.

 

Reasons why I think these settings make an actual difference and are not just a placebo effect:

1) When you have good hit registration you can feel it, the gun is more accurate and powerful and most of all gun fights (even the ones you lose) feel fair rather than WTF? moments. I still have matches that don't go so well but it feels more like the other player was just better rather than why is my connection so crappy this match.

2) Although using the DumaOS recommended QoS settings did seem to give me a better connection (at first), it would only ever last a couple of matches. I think this is because of Xbox's NAT and connection sharing techinque but I'm really not sure. From what I understand, if you have an open NAT and a good connection then players with a bad connection can borrow some of your good connection to make the playing field more fair. This of course reduces the quality of your connection. So my theory is that the DumaOS recommended settings give too good of a connection, Call of Duty notices and starts pimping out your connection without your permission.  I'm not nearly tech savvy enough to go into the details but research how xbox uses NAT and you should be able to find more details.

 

Okay there, I've given my 2 cents, now criticize or applaud, and tell me what you think.

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First of all I would like to hear opinions about the implications of 5G internet on gaming and lag compensation. From what I have read, 5G is supposed to offer gigabit internet with no more than 1 ms round trip latency. If that is true and everyone has less than 1 ms ping would that make the need for lag compensation obsolete?

 

 

5G is for mobile internet only though, like 4G LTE. Thats never going to compete with full fibre to the home at a cost that people can afford for unlimited data. Also signal quality will still effect your connection, and bad weather etc can mess things too, plus how many users are on 5G I imagine in any one area.

 

 As far as Xbox 'pimping out your connection" surely that depends on the quality of the other persons physical line and if they are on fibre, copper or a mix like FTTC. Xbox cant give a bad line a good connection to reduce pings and latency that's down to the law of physics of each users connection, also they may be using Wi-Fi not Ethernet for the console too. If I had a bad line with high latency and bad pings because I had say copper and aluminium in the mix between me and the cab plus there was a lot of congestion at peak times a console cant make my line better by 'borrowing' from another user.

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5G is for mobile internet only though, like 4G LTE. Thats never going to compete with full fibre to the home at a cost that people can afford for unlimited data. Also signal quality will still effect your connection, and bad weather etc can mess things too, plus how many users are on 5G I imagine in any one area.

 

 As far as Xbox 'pimping out your connection" surely that depends on the quality of the other persons physical line and if they are on fibre, copper or a mix like FTTC. Xbox cant give a bad line a good connection to reduce pings and latency that's down to the law of physics of each users connection, also they may be using Wi-Fi not Ethernet for the console too. If I had a bad line with high latency and bad pings because I had say copper and aluminium in the mix between me and the cab plus there was a lot of congestion at peak times a console cant make my line better by 'borrowing' from another user.

 

Not sure why you think 5G has to be limited to mobile networks. Here is one example:

https://www.pcmag.com/news/352121/first-look-at-verizons-5g-home-router

 

I'm not saying xbox can give a bad line a good connection and yes I agree everyone's connection plays a role. 

I remember reading something a while back about how xbox live uses NAT that discussed something to do with allowing players to connect to other players rather than the server if it was more beneficial. I can't seem to find that article in google searches so I will withdraw that statement.

 

I'm just saying that turning off high priority traffic and leaving anti bufferbloat off as well seems to be better sometimes. At least in the overall long term testing that I did with Black ops IIII beta and WWII. I made some guesses for why I think it may have helped but I certainly don't know for sure. Maybe it was placebo but try it for an extended period and you might find that it is actually better overall.

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Not sure why you think 5G has to be limited to mobile networks. Here is one example:

https://www.pcmag.com/news/352121/first-look-at-verizons-5g-home-router 

 

I'm not saying xbox can give a bad line a good connection and yes I agree everyone's connection plays a role. 

I remember reading something a while back about how xbox live uses NAT that discussed something to do with allowing players to connect to other players rather than the server if it was more beneficial. I can't seem to find that article in google searches so I will withdraw that statement.

 

I'm just saying that turning off high priority traffic and leaving anti bufferbloat off as well seems to be better sometimes. At least in the overall long term testing that I did with Black ops IIII beta and WWII. I made some guesses for why I think it may have helped but I certainly don't know for sure. Maybe it was placebo but try it for an extended period and you might find that it is actually better overall.

That page alas cant be found, but it still is a router using a 5G radio connection that's governed by signal strength and weather etc.  If you could find another link that would be great. Settings are a weird things each line is unique, whatever works for you that gives you the best gaming experience is all that matters. :)

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That page alas cant be found, but it still is a router using a 5G radio connection that's governed by signal strength and weather etc.  If you could find another link that would be great. 

 

The link should be fixed now in my previous post. Feel free to google search 5g and 5g routers as well.

I believe it's supposed to use 28 GHz so I'm not sure how it will be affected by weather and such. But assuming that it works as some predict and everyone playing COD has more than enough bandwidth and ping of 1 ms, would lag comp no longer be necessary?

 

 

Settings are a weird things each line is unique, whatever works for you that gives you the best gaming experience is all that matters. :)

Very true. 

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Having read this it seems its more designed to fill in not spots rather than replace fixed fibre wifi, also its based in the US and I'm in the UK. Spectrum and aerial placement seems quite important so I cant really say much until its been tested. If you have many users in an already using that cell tower you still may get issues with speed drops I suppose. We will have to wait and see but I don't see it replacing mainstream fibre, more supplementing it in rural areas. :)

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