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Boldshoter30

CAT 6 to CAT 7 JITTER BYE BYE

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seem to have found a way to completely eliminate jitter for good, when I was running CAT 6 cables not 6A, even with anti-bufferbloat enabled set correctly I was still running into jitter on ping plotter, noticeable difference for gaming to, either was hit or miss, like always for me pinging twitter still gives jitter, but google straight as a arrow with CAT 7 Tera Grand from fiber Modem to XR500, and for the ps4, and my PC here is some screen shots down below.736501281_CAT7.thumb.JPG.ca2ab46e0bc6ee2168e0eb20eaf1121b.JPG619047988_CAT72.thumb.JPG.c1675f391e10f5eabe58ab13c87def0e.JPG41005486_1258228077685256_6159694379112988672_n.thumb.jpg.6717d0768ecd681942c374f56d802406.jpg

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That's a nice smooth line. I'm glad you've got your jitter sorted out!

For anyone else looking to reduce jitter - CAT-7 cables can help, as can just replacing older Ethernet wires. Upgrading your modem can also help - often the simpler and cheaper options can be more stable but do your research. The main factor for improving jitter / spikes tends to be your ISP line though, and unfortunately for lots of people you can get stuck with a really bad line. In that case, it's up to your ISP to sort it out, and taking Pingplotter tests is a great way to gather evidence to get your ISP to take action.

Cheers Boldshoter :)

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Well, it's a funny old thing and coincidence this topic should appear. This prompted me to check my cables and run a BQM. I found massive spikes and the only thing I had altered in my network lately was to add a Netgear S8000 switch...........Yes, I used the friggin cable it came with (UTP which I hadn't noticed) as it was only 12inches long and was a perfect length. I had a heart attack this morning when I checked my BQM so I repleced that cable and hopefully my BQM wil;l be level again. Just goes to show a slight overlook on your cables can be horrific!

Pingplotter ran as soon as I swapped cable.................................BQM shows horrific spikes and packet loss........cable swapped over at 2pm.

 

Now all I need is interleaving to go away and drop back down to 7ms ping!

 

2018-09-06 (1).png

2018-09-06.png

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1 hour ago, BIG__DOG said:

Well, it's a funny old thing and coincidence this topic should appear. This prompted me to check my cables and run a BQM. I found massive spikes and the only thing I had altered in my network lately was to add a Netgear S8000 switch...........Yes, I used the friggin cable it came with (UTP which I hadn't noticed) as it was only 12inches long and was a perfect length. I had a heart attack this morning when I checked my BQM so I repleced that cable and hopefully my BQM wil;l be level again. Just goes to show a slight overlook on your cables can be horrific!

Pingplotter ran as soon as I swapped cable.................................BQM shows horrific spikes and packet loss........cable swapped over at 2pm.

 

Now all I need is interleaving to go away and drop back down to 7ms ping!

 

2018-09-06 (1).png

2018-09-06.png

that's a nice stable line now, I'm sure it was a lot worse with unshielded cables, makes me wonder why router companies don't give shielded cables no hate directed towards them though, glad I made the switch though, when I was completely oblivious no know how or what shielded, or unshielded cables are, and the benefits for shielded, noticed a drastic change in my gaming hit detection, plus with CAT 7 little bit higher speeds for my gigabit connection, which my ISP caps to 800 - 875MBPS ish , replaced every cable with CAT 7 double shielded, including the inner twisted strands are shielded, as well from outside interference's, no more packet loss as well.    

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26 minutes ago, Boldshoter30 said:

how do you get rid of interleaving??

you need a stable connection. Interleaving is applied on VDSL lines to maintain stability on a line with noise issues. Interleaving can be applied to a line if a modem is started several times in a relatively short period of time. I was messing about with mine the other day and interleave was imposed on my connection. It takes roughly 9 - 11 days for it to be lifted and to be placed on fastpath again.

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On 9/5/2018 at 6:11 AM, Boldshoter30 said:

seem to have found a way to completely eliminate jitter for good, when I was running CAT 6 cables not 6A, even with anti-bufferbloat enabled set correctly I was still running into jitter on ping plotter, noticeable difference for gaming to, either was hit or miss, like always for me pinging twitter still gives jitter, but google straight as a arrow with CAT 7 Tera Grand from fiber Modem to XR500, and for the ps4, and my PC here is some screen shots down below.736501281_CAT7.thumb.JPG.ca2ab46e0bc6ee2168e0eb20eaf1121b.JPG619047988_CAT72.thumb.JPG.c1675f391e10f5eabe58ab13c87def0e.JPG41005486_1258228077685256_6159694379112988672_n.thumb.jpg.6717d0768ecd681942c374f56d802406.jpg

can you suggest i cable for a dsl internet speed of 40 down and 10 up? is cat5e enough? should i also take a look if its double shielded? thx in advance.

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I honestly would go with anything 6 or greater because of the shielding factor but that's me.

  • Cat-5e:     This form of cable is recognized by the TIA/EIA and is defined in TIA/EIA-568-B.. It has a slightly higher frequency specification that Cat-5 cable as the performance extends up to 125 Mbps. It can be used for 100Base-T and 1000Base-t (Gigabit Ethernet). Cat 5e or enhanced is a form of Cat 5 cable manufactured t0 higher specifications although physically the same as Cat 5. It is tested to a higher specification.
  • Cat-6:     This cable is defined in TIA/EIA-568-B provides a significant improvement in performance over Cat5 and Cat 5e. During manufacture Cat 6 cables are more tightly wound than either Cat 5 or Cat 5e and they often have an outer foil or braided shielding. The shielding protects the twisted pairs of wires inside the Ethernet cable, helping to prevent crosstalk and noise interference. Cat-6 cables can technically support speeds up to 10 Gbps, but can only do so for up to 55 meters.
  • Cat-6a:     The “a” in Cat 6a stands for “Augmented.” The Cat 6a cables are able to support twice the maximum bandwidth, and are capable of maintaining higher transmission speeds over longer cable lengths. Cat 6a cables utilize shielded which is sufficient to all but eliminate crosstalk. However this makes them less flexible than Cat 6 cable.
  • Cat-7:     This is an informal number for ISO/IEC 11801 Class F cabling. It comprises four individually shielded pairs inside an overall shield. It is aimed at applications where transmission of frequencies up to 600 Mbps is required.
  • Cat-8:     These cables are still in development, but will be released in the foreseeable future to provide further improvements in speed and general performance.

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1

16 hours ago, JOE1305 said:

can you suggest i cable for a dsl internet speed of 40 down and 10 up? is cat5e enough? should i also take a look if its double shielded? thx in advance.

Doulbe check if you can that your dsl cable (that runs from your socket to your modem (rj11 connectors on each end) is a shielded cable also. There are sellers out there that sell cat6 cables with rj11 on either end. Just do your homework and ditch the shitty cable that comes with your modem/router. This is a cable that many DSL users overlook!

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39 minutes ago, BIG__DOG said:

1

Doulbe check if you can that your dsl cable (that runs from your socket to your modem (rj11 connectors on each end) is a shielded cable also. There are sellers out there that sell cat6 cables with rj11 on either end. Just do your homework and ditch the shitty cable that comes with your modem/router. This is a cable that many DSL users overlook!

thx big dog, i will check it

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4 hours ago, BIG__DOG said:

1

Doulbe check if you can that your dsl cable (that runs from your socket to your modem (rj11 connectors on each end) is a shielded cable also. There are sellers out there that sell cat6 cables with rj11 on either end. Just do your homework and ditch the shitty cable that comes with your modem/router. This is a cable that many DSL users overlook!

hi big dog. my fritzbox supports only ethernet cables with rj45. but thanks for your advise anyway.

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I believe BigDog was referring to the phone line cable (RJ11) that comes in from the phone line wall jack to your DSL modem. We presume you have a DSL modem which most use RJ11 on the incoming ISP service line to the DSL Modem/Router.

 

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