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Boldshoter30

CAT 6 to CAT 7 JITTER BYE BYE

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seem to have found a way to completely eliminate jitter for good, when I was running CAT 6 cables not 6A, even with anti-bufferbloat enabled set correctly I was still running into jitter on ping plotter, noticeable difference for gaming to, either was hit or miss, like always for me pinging twitter still gives jitter, but google straight as a arrow with CAT 7 Tera Grand from fiber Modem to XR500, and for the ps4, and my PC here is some screen shots down below.736501281_CAT7.thumb.JPG.ca2ab46e0bc6ee2168e0eb20eaf1121b.JPG619047988_CAT72.thumb.JPG.c1675f391e10f5eabe58ab13c87def0e.JPG41005486_1258228077685256_6159694379112988672_n.thumb.jpg.6717d0768ecd681942c374f56d802406.jpg

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That's a nice smooth line. I'm glad you've got your jitter sorted out!

For anyone else looking to reduce jitter - CAT-7 cables can help, as can just replacing older Ethernet wires. Upgrading your modem can also help - often the simpler and cheaper options can be more stable but do your research. The main factor for improving jitter / spikes tends to be your ISP line though, and unfortunately for lots of people you can get stuck with a really bad line. In that case, it's up to your ISP to sort it out, and taking Pingplotter tests is a great way to gather evidence to get your ISP to take action.

Cheers Boldshoter :)

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Well, it's a funny old thing and coincidence this topic should appear. This prompted me to check my cables and run a BQM. I found massive spikes and the only thing I had altered in my network lately was to add a Netgear S8000 switch...........Yes, I used the friggin cable it came with (UTP which I hadn't noticed) as it was only 12inches long and was a perfect length. I had a heart attack this morning when I checked my BQM so I repleced that cable and hopefully my BQM wil;l be level again. Just goes to show a slight overlook on your cables can be horrific!

Pingplotter ran as soon as I swapped cable.................................BQM shows horrific spikes and packet loss........cable swapped over at 2pm.

 

Now all I need is interleaving to go away and drop back down to 7ms ping!

 

2018-09-06 (1).png

2018-09-06.png

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1 hour ago, BIG__DOG said:

Well, it's a funny old thing and coincidence this topic should appear. This prompted me to check my cables and run a BQM. I found massive spikes and the only thing I had altered in my network lately was to add a Netgear S8000 switch...........Yes, I used the friggin cable it came with (UTP which I hadn't noticed) as it was only 12inches long and was a perfect length. I had a heart attack this morning when I checked my BQM so I repleced that cable and hopefully my BQM wil;l be level again. Just goes to show a slight overlook on your cables can be horrific!

Pingplotter ran as soon as I swapped cable.................................BQM shows horrific spikes and packet loss........cable swapped over at 2pm.

 

Now all I need is interleaving to go away and drop back down to 7ms ping!

 

2018-09-06 (1).png

2018-09-06.png

that's a nice stable line now, I'm sure it was a lot worse with unshielded cables, makes me wonder why router companies don't give shielded cables no hate directed towards them though, glad I made the switch though, when I was completely oblivious no know how or what shielded, or unshielded cables are, and the benefits for shielded, noticed a drastic change in my gaming hit detection, plus with CAT 7 little bit higher speeds for my gigabit connection, which my ISP caps to 800 - 875MBPS ish , replaced every cable with CAT 7 double shielded, including the inner twisted strands are shielded, as well from outside interference's, no more packet loss as well.    

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26 minutes ago, Boldshoter30 said:

how do you get rid of interleaving??

you need a stable connection. Interleaving is applied on VDSL lines to maintain stability on a line with noise issues. Interleaving can be applied to a line if a modem is started several times in a relatively short period of time. I was messing about with mine the other day and interleave was imposed on my connection. It takes roughly 9 - 11 days for it to be lifted and to be placed on fastpath again.

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On 9/5/2018 at 6:11 AM, Boldshoter30 said:

seem to have found a way to completely eliminate jitter for good, when I was running CAT 6 cables not 6A, even with anti-bufferbloat enabled set correctly I was still running into jitter on ping plotter, noticeable difference for gaming to, either was hit or miss, like always for me pinging twitter still gives jitter, but google straight as a arrow with CAT 7 Tera Grand from fiber Modem to XR500, and for the ps4, and my PC here is some screen shots down below.736501281_CAT7.thumb.JPG.ca2ab46e0bc6ee2168e0eb20eaf1121b.JPG619047988_CAT72.thumb.JPG.c1675f391e10f5eabe58ab13c87def0e.JPG41005486_1258228077685256_6159694379112988672_n.thumb.jpg.6717d0768ecd681942c374f56d802406.jpg

can you suggest i cable for a dsl internet speed of 40 down and 10 up? is cat5e enough? should i also take a look if its double shielded? thx in advance.

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I honestly would go with anything 6 or greater because of the shielding factor but that's me.

  • Cat-5e:     This form of cable is recognized by the TIA/EIA and is defined in TIA/EIA-568-B.. It has a slightly higher frequency specification that Cat-5 cable as the performance extends up to 125 Mbps. It can be used for 100Base-T and 1000Base-t (Gigabit Ethernet). Cat 5e or enhanced is a form of Cat 5 cable manufactured t0 higher specifications although physically the same as Cat 5. It is tested to a higher specification.
  • Cat-6:     This cable is defined in TIA/EIA-568-B provides a significant improvement in performance over Cat5 and Cat 5e. During manufacture Cat 6 cables are more tightly wound than either Cat 5 or Cat 5e and they often have an outer foil or braided shielding. The shielding protects the twisted pairs of wires inside the Ethernet cable, helping to prevent crosstalk and noise interference. Cat-6 cables can technically support speeds up to 10 Gbps, but can only do so for up to 55 meters.
  • Cat-6a:     The “a” in Cat 6a stands for “Augmented.” The Cat 6a cables are able to support twice the maximum bandwidth, and are capable of maintaining higher transmission speeds over longer cable lengths. Cat 6a cables utilize shielded which is sufficient to all but eliminate crosstalk. However this makes them less flexible than Cat 6 cable.
  • Cat-7:     This is an informal number for ISO/IEC 11801 Class F cabling. It comprises four individually shielded pairs inside an overall shield. It is aimed at applications where transmission of frequencies up to 600 Mbps is required.
  • Cat-8:     These cables are still in development, but will be released in the foreseeable future to provide further improvements in speed and general performance.

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1

16 hours ago, JOE1305 said:

can you suggest i cable for a dsl internet speed of 40 down and 10 up? is cat5e enough? should i also take a look if its double shielded? thx in advance.

Doulbe check if you can that your dsl cable (that runs from your socket to your modem (rj11 connectors on each end) is a shielded cable also. There are sellers out there that sell cat6 cables with rj11 on either end. Just do your homework and ditch the shitty cable that comes with your modem/router. This is a cable that many DSL users overlook!

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39 minutes ago, BIG__DOG said:

1

Doulbe check if you can that your dsl cable (that runs from your socket to your modem (rj11 connectors on each end) is a shielded cable also. There are sellers out there that sell cat6 cables with rj11 on either end. Just do your homework and ditch the shitty cable that comes with your modem/router. This is a cable that many DSL users overlook!

thx big dog, i will check it

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4 hours ago, BIG__DOG said:

1

Doulbe check if you can that your dsl cable (that runs from your socket to your modem (rj11 connectors on each end) is a shielded cable also. There are sellers out there that sell cat6 cables with rj11 on either end. Just do your homework and ditch the shitty cable that comes with your modem/router. This is a cable that many DSL users overlook!

hi big dog. my fritzbox supports only ethernet cables with rj45. but thanks for your advise anyway.

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I believe BigDog was referring to the phone line cable (RJ11) that comes in from the phone line wall jack to your DSL modem. We presume you have a DSL modem which most use RJ11 on the incoming ISP service line to the DSL Modem/Router.

 

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Sorry for the necro lads... just need some feedback from the OP. 

 

@Boldshoter30 I noticed the packaging says double shielded, which is probably F/STP or S/STP. Have you grounded your cables? I'm looking to replace some around my home and I wanted to grab some CAT7 for "future proofing" as well as to see if it could help further reduce jitter on my network after reading your post, but all I can find are either STP or flat UTP when I just want plain round UTP.

 

I've learned that not grounding STP cables can in fact cause more issues in terms of interference and performance than not using shielding at all - hence them only being recommended for industrial use in locations with large amounts of EMI. I'm trying to rule out potential causes of issues with connections in games and just wanted some clarification regarding your setup. I'm currently using a 15m F/STP between modem and R1, and performance is arguably worse than when I used the same spec but with UTP for the same distance. I'd rather not spend extra money on shielded cable that'll either provide zero additional benefit due to not grounding or, even worse, make things worse lol. Thanks! 

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On 9/12/2018 at 1:56 PM, JOE1305 said:

can you suggest i cable for a dsl internet speed of 40 down and 10 up? is cat5e enough? should i also take a look if its double shielded? thx in advance.

I recently picked up one of these myself. Solid quality as you'd get with Mr Telephone's DSL cables (he doesn't seem to be around on eBay anymore) and you can send the seller a note requesting a white cable too if you'd prefer. 

 

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F323307039978Screenshot_20181023-162401.thumb.png.eac6c4fce3303f1d9c225683f6744066.png

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@JOE1305 I was gonna edit my post to include more info but you'd already seen it so I thought I'd just add more here lol

 

The plug that goes into your wall socket is RJ45 (like a standard patch cable) rather than the skinny RJ11 plug, and it fits more snugly into the socket. CAT6 is the highest spec you'll probably find as all VDSL2 lines cap out at 80Mb I believe. Of course it's also twisted pair rather than the cheap flat crap you get bundled with routers and modems these days. I'd recommend getting a 0.25-1m cable depending on how close you can get your modem to your wall socket and a power socket too of course. I personally got a 1m cable but wish I'd gone for 0.5m as it's a sturdy old thing and pushes my modem out from under my table LOL

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Thanks for your effort bro. I already found great cables double shielded unfortunately they are 1,5m long. Couldnt get lower though. Does it make such a difference when its not a 0,5m cable? I think there is no really difference, besides its a 10m long cable lmfao

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9 minutes ago, JOE1305 said:

Thanks for your effort bro. I already found great cables double shielded unfortunately they are 1,5m long. Couldnt get lower though. Does it make such a difference when its not a 0,5m cable? I think there is no really difference, besides its a 10m long cable lmfao

The longer the cable, the more distance your data needs to travel to reach its destination (i.e higher latency). I'd say 1 meter isn't going to make a difference though - at least not a noticeable difference :)

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1 hour ago, JOE1305 said:

Thanks for your effort bro. I already found great cables double shielded unfortunately they are 1,5m long. Couldnt get lower though. Does it make such a difference when its not a 0,5m cable? I think there is no really difference, besides its a 10m long cable lmfao

With VDSL cables I believe they're very sensitive to "signal" (or whatever) loss over distance, far more so than ethernet cables. I'd always recommend 1m max for those, and then as long an ethernet cable as you need to reach the router :)

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5 hours ago, JOE1305 said:

Merci pour vos efforts, mon frère. J'ai déjà trouvé d'excellents câbles à double blindage, malheureusement, ils mesurent 1,5 m de long. Impossible de descendre plus bas. Cela fait-il une telle différence quand ce n'est pas un câble de 0,5 m? Je pense qu’il n’ya pas vraiment de différence, à part un câble de 10m de long lmfao

Personnellement je suis en fibre ftth j'ai un câble ethernet de mon xr500 à mon pc de 30 mètre et je suis à 3ms de ping donc sur le câble ethernet tu n'a rien à craindre tu commence à avoir une perte de signal à partir de 100 metre acheté juste un bon câble ethernet 

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56 minutes ago, Locosano said:

Personnellement je suis en fibre ftth j'ai un câble ethernet de mon xr500 à mon pc de 30 mètre et je suis à 3ms de ping donc sur le câble ethernet tu n'a rien à craindre tu commence à avoir une perte de signal à partir de 100 metre acheté juste un bon câble ethernet 

 

 

I think FTTH is a little different though... what type of cable do you have between the wall and your modem? I believe VDSL2 (FTTC) cables are quite sensitive to performance loss over longer distances. CAT6 ethernet cables can be run for around 100m before performance degrades as you correctly stated :)

FTTH est un peu différent cependant ... quel type de câble avez-vous entre le mur et votre modem? Je pense que les câbles VDSL2 (FTTC) sont très sensibles aux pertes de performances sur de longues distances. Les câbles Ethernet CAT6 peuvent fonctionner pendant environ 100 m avant que les performances ne se dégradent comme vous l'avez indiqué correctement :)

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30 minutes ago, lllRL said:

 

 

Je pense que FTTH est un peu différent cependant ... quel type de câble avez-vous entre le mur et votre modem? Je pense que les câbles VDSL2 (FTTC) sont très sensibles aux pertes de performances sur de longues distances. Les câbles Ethernet CAT6 peuvent parcourir environ 100 m avant que les performances ne se dégradent comme vous l'avez indiqué correctement:)

FTTH est un peu différent cependant ... quel type de câble avez-vous entre le mur et votre modem? VDSL2 (FTTC) sont très sensibles aux pertes de performances sur de longues distances. Les câbles Ethernet CAT6 peuvent fonctionner pendant environ 100 m avant que les performances ne se dégradent pas:)

Salut irl entre le mur et mon modem c'est un câble de fibre optique oui la vdsl et sur une base de cuivre comme l'a dsl d'ailleurs donc les distances joue beaucoup sur la qualité de ligne 

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